What to Look For in a Construction Quality Management Software Program



If you’re looking for quality management software for your construction business, it’s important to understand the differences between the available options. For example, most software is designed to address only the quality-control component of quality management. Although this is an essential part of a quality management system, the software you choose should also allow you to address the other elements of quality management—quality planning, quality improvement, and quality assurance.

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Tips for Getting Subcontractor Performance Back on Track

 

Having an underperforming subcontractor on the team can drag a project down, causing unnecessary delays, increasing costs, and affecting morale. It’s up to the super to recognize when a subcontractor is out of control and then to take steps to fix the problem. Some of the signs of poor subcontractor performance include:

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How to Create a Quality Program That Subcontractors Will Want to Embrace

Superintendents and subcontractors are all working toward the same goals, but sometimes relationships can be strained when expectations are not communicated clearly. Approaching subcontractors as partners instead of adversaries is essential for achieving first-time quality, which is why it is so important to build consensus around your quality program. The earlier you can involve them in the project, ideally during the pre-construction phase, the more likely they are to understand your quality goals and help you meet them.

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How Construction Quality Managers Use Project Meetings to Prevent Issues

Pre-construction meetings, informal lookaheads, and formal preparatory meetings are common practices for planning project details for upcoming work.. However, construction quality managers are not always considered key participants. Construction quality managers should be there to actively support the superintendent in delivering a quality project.. When it comes to meetings, this means putting quality on the agenda and leading discussions on upcoming quality concerns.

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How to Build a Company-Wide Construction Quality Management Process

We often hear from builders who are trying to create a consistent quality approach. They have employees with different levels of experience in the company, and they’re all trying to achieve quality in their own ways. If this sounds familiar to you, you’re probably looking for a way to capture the best quality management methods and share them with everyone. This is a common challenge for organizations that operate in multiple locations and have several projects going on at the same time, but it can happen in companies of all sizes. The solution is to build a company-wide quality management process.

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7 Steps to Presenting Your Construction Quality Program to Management

Construction quality management can be a bit of a mystery to people who don’t do it on a daily basis. Even the managers who hired you don’t necessarily know what is required to achieve first-time quality. Without having a base of knowledge about the benefits of first-time quality and how to obtain them, many managers will quality management as just a line item expense where they should be seeing it as profit center. This is why educating top managers and proactively selling the idea are such important steps in implementing your quality management program.

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Using Construction Quality Management Software to Improve Subcontractor Performance

One of the myths that we hear repeated time and again is that defining construction quality is difficult, and if you can’t define it then measuring and managing quality performance is near impossible.

We disagree. Defining quality is the first step—and the easiest one—and with the right tools and systems, measuring and managing performance can be seamlessly integrated into your daily workflow. That’s where quality management software comes in.

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Building Consensus Around a Quality Program With Top Management

Although quality managers are responsible for overseeing a quality program, they’re not the only people who must sign off on it. For a quality program to be effective, everybody on the team must buy in. This is why building consensus with key stakeholders should be one of the first steps you take in introducing a quality program. Whether you’re replacing an existing system or rolling out a new program, having organization executives on board from the beginning will help you build support with other decision makers.

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Sell Your Construction Quality Program to Superintendents With These Quick Tips

Building consensus around a construction quality program is necessary if you want your process to go smoothly. If you don’t involve key stakeholders, you are likely to face resistance. On the other hand, if you take the time to learn more about the thoughts of others on the team, you are more likely to get early buy-in and adoption of any new systems you roll out.

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How Construction Quality Managers can Get Project Managers’ Support

Effective construction quality management is an organization-wide effort, not just the responsibility of the quality manager. Getting key stakeholders on board to implement a quality program requires effort from the beginning of the process. In your role as quality manager, the sooner you can gain support and build consensus with top management leaders, superintendents, project managers, and others, the easier it will be to roll out the systems and processes that support your quality program.

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